Results of the YouGov poll about UBI

A new poll by WeMove and YouGov shows that around two-thirds of Europeans want governments to put in place a Universal Basic Income (UBI) where every person in the EU receives a direct cash payment every month, implying European leaders discussing post-COVID-19 recovery at European Council (10-11 December) should include UBI in their plans to boost the EU economy. This measure is supported by 65% of the people - but if the respondents are asked to think about the current pandemic before answering the question, the result goes up to 68%. See table

The survey was conducted independently by YouGov in 6 European countries - France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain - where people expressed strong support for a UBI and would like their governments to set up a pilot project. The poll found that two-thirds (65%) or more of respondents in the six countries were in favour of pilots of a basic income system, with support ranging from 52% in France to 83% in Portugal. Women were generally more supportive, particularly in Germany, France, Italy and Spain. See table

In the poll, respondents were asked about the benefits of a European UBI could have for them if introduced. The top benefits named were: reduction of anxiety (42%), being able to pay for basic needs (33%) and more financial and personal independence (29%) but the results vary from country to country and among age groups. Only 15% of people said a UBI would have no benefits for them whatsoever, ranging from 6% in Italy to 22% in France. See table

In the attachments below you can read the results of the poll for each country, and the overall results.

Germany: People who support UBI is 59 percent  and 60 percent when considering the economic impact of the pandemic. For Germans, the benefits of a UBI included not only paying for basic needs (26%), but a reduction in anxiety for the future (40%) and the possibility to focus on doing valuable things that under our current system don’t pay the bills – like caring for others (19%), volunteering (18%) or training (15%).

Spain: People who support UBI is 68 percent and 72 percent when considering the economic impact of the pandemic. For Spanish people, the benefits of a UBI included not only financial security (44%) but a reduction in anxiety for the future (40%) and the possibility to focus on doing valuable things that under our current system don’t pay the bills – like caring for others (19%), volunteering (11%) or training (22%).

Italy: People who support UBI is 64 percent and 74 percent when considering the economic impact of the economy from the pandemic. For Italians, the benefits of a UBI included not only paying for basic needs (30%) but a reduction in anxiety for the future (42%) and the possibility to focus on doing valuable things that under our current system don’t pay the bills – like caring for others (19%), volunteering (12%) or training (19%).

France: People who support UBI is 52 percent and 54 percent when considering the economic impact of the pandemic. For the French, the benefits of a UBI included not only paying for basic needs (28%), but a reduction in anxiety for the future (26%) and the possibility to pay for leisure activities that they currently can’t afford (28%).

Poland: People who support UBI is 73 percent and 69 percent when considering the economic impact of the pandemic. For Poles, the benefits of a UBI included not only included paying for basic needs (33%) but a reduction in anxiety for the future (56%) and the possibility to focus on doing valuable things that under our current system don’t pay the bills – like caring for others (25%), volunteering (14%) or training (22%).

Methodology: This survey has been conducted using an online interview administered to members of the YouGov Plc UK panel of 800,000+ individuals who have agreed to take part in surveys. Emails are sent to panellists selected at random from the base sample. The e-mail invites them to take part in a survey and provides a generic survey link. Once a panel member clicks on the link they are sent to the survey that they are most required for, according to the sample definition and quotas. (The sample definition could be "GB adult population" or a subset such as "GB adult females"). Invitations to surveys don’t expire and respondents can be sent to any available survey. The responding sample is weighted to the profile of the sample definition to provide a representative reporting sample. The profile is normally derived from census data or, if not available from the census, from industry accepted data.

The sample sizes were: 2150 for Germany, 1052 for all other countries. For more see the "Background" sections in the documents below.